Best Memory Cards for the Canon EOS M6 Mark II

You might not need the most expensive card for the Canon M6 Mark II, or you might need more memory than you thought. This article has all the info you need to decide
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The Canon EOS M6 Mark II is one my recommended choices for YouTubers and beginner filmmakers. So what size memory card will suit your needs? This article will detail the best memory cards for the Canon EOS M6 Mark II.

The two best choices of memory cards for the Canon EOS M6 Mark II are the Sandisk 128GB and an alternative just as good is the Lexar 128GB UHS-II V90 card.

Last update on 2021-08-31 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

These two cards are however the all round best cards that will suit most needs. These are good cards if you are not yet sure of your needs or they may change later. 

Perhaps you will focus on video later and photography first? 

If you know your actual needs, maybe you won’t film much video, then you won’t need a larger capacity card than if you were just focusing on photography.

Canon EOS M6 Mark II Mirrorless Camera for Vlogging + 15-45mm Lens, CMOS, APS-C Sensor, Dual Pixel CMOS Auto Focus, Wi-Fi,Bluetooth and 4K Video
  • High image quality with 32.5 Megapixel CMOS (APS-C) sensor,
  • High-speed continuous shooting of up to 14 fps with AF/AE tracking

Last update on 2021-07-29 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Knowing which card best suits your needs means you won’t buy an expensive large capacity card when all you do is shoot jpegs, or buy too small a card, running out of space when you film weddings.

Below are tables of recording times with the best suitable cards for the Canon EOS M6 Mark II. And Later on in the article I go over all the lingo and information on the face of the SD card so you know what type of card you are buying.

Choosing the Best Memory Card for the Canon EOS M6 Mark II

The Canon M6 Mark II uses SD cards for data capture, which are a relatively ubiquitous storage format.

The EOS M6 Mark II has a single SD card slot, which Canon say is compatible with high speed UHS-II SD cards.

The Canon M6 Mark II can use both UHS-I and UHS-II cards, however for 4K video which the M6 Mark II is capable of, I would always recommend a UHS-II card.

You can use UHS-I, but for high demain video like 4K or Full HD 120p, UHS-II cards are recommended.

For UHS-II cards, they should be SDHC or SDXC compliant, although go for SDXC cards as they are higher capacity cards.

The minimum SD card requirement for 4K and Full HD 120p recording is a UHS-I, UHS Speed Class 3 or higher. But I stress, that is a minimum. I would still recommend UHS-II.

The two types of UHS-II cards you can choose from are the V60 and V90 cards. I explain later in the article what all the SD card lingo means.

Filmmakers and YouTubers should note, for SDXC compliant cards, long video recording files (files exceeding 4GB in size) will be recorded as one single file on the SD card.

For any other type of SD card, the maximum duration of a video is 4GB. Longer than that and the video will be split into two or more separate video files.

Best Choice
SanDisk 128GB Extreme PRO SDXC UHS-II Memory Card - C10, U3, V90, 8K, 4K, Full HD Video, SD Card - SDSDXDK-128G-GN4IN
Lexar Professional 1667x 128GB SDXC UHS-II Card, Up To 250MB/s Read, for Professional Photographer, Videographer, Enthusiast (LSD128CBNA1667)
Compatible Card
SanDisk 128GB Extreme PRO SDXC UHS-II Memory Card - C10, U3, V90, 8K, 4K, Full HD Video, SD Card - SDSDXDK-128G-GN4IN
Lexar Professional 1667x 128GB SDXC UHS-II Card, Up To 250MB/s Read, for Professional Photographer, Videographer, Enthusiast (LSD128CBNA1667)
V Speed
V90
V60
Recording Time (Full HD, 120FPS, Bitrate 120)
2Hrs 22 Minutes
2Hrs 22 Minutes
Recording Time (4K, Bitrate 300)
56 Minutes
56 Minutes
Prime
Best Choice
SanDisk 128GB Extreme PRO SDXC UHS-II Memory Card - C10, U3, V90, 8K, 4K, Full HD Video, SD Card - SDSDXDK-128G-GN4IN
Compatible Card
SanDisk 128GB Extreme PRO SDXC UHS-II Memory Card - C10, U3, V90, 8K, 4K, Full HD Video, SD Card - SDSDXDK-128G-GN4IN
V Speed
V90
Recording Time (Full HD, 120FPS, Bitrate 120)
2Hrs 22 Minutes
Recording Time (4K, Bitrate 300)
56 Minutes
Prime
Lexar Professional 1667x 128GB SDXC UHS-II Card, Up To 250MB/s Read, for Professional Photographer, Videographer, Enthusiast (LSD128CBNA1667)
Compatible Card
Lexar Professional 1667x 128GB SDXC UHS-II Card, Up To 250MB/s Read, for Professional Photographer, Videographer, Enthusiast (LSD128CBNA1667)
V Speed
V60
Recording Time (Full HD, 120FPS, Bitrate 120)
2Hrs 22 Minutes
Recording Time (4K, Bitrate 300)
56 Minutes
Prime

Last update on 2021-08-31 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

SD Cards Explained

On the front of the SD card are various symbols and numbers that will let you know what the card is capable of recording (reading and writing).

This way you can work out if the card will be able to record photos and video at the optimal speeds necessary.

SDHC or SDXC

The only real difference between the two is that they represent two types of filing systems which represents higher memory capacities.

The SDHC filing system holds up to 32GB of storage, where the SDXC system can hold up to 2TB. Although there are only cards up to 512GB available (as of the publication date of this article).

Maximum Read Speeds

In general SD card manufacturers don’t really advertise the write speeds of their cards, so the top left or right number will most often represent the maximum achievable read speed.

The read speed is more of relevance to photographers than videographers.

With video the most important number to look for is the sustained speed. The reason it’s important is because when the sustained speed falls below the video bit rate you will get dropped frames, and that stuttering feel during playback.

Memory Capacity

Memory capacity is the most recognized and understood number on the face of the SD card, representing the storage capacity of that SD card in gigabytes.

Speed Class Rating

The extra numbers on the top right side of the face of the SD card represent the speed class of the SD card.

The letter C on the card with a number enclosed inside, 2, 4, 6, and 10 represents the minimum write speed, for example, 2MBps for class 2, 4MBps for class 4 etc. This is the minimum rate and not the actual rate.

The letter U with a number 1 or 3 inside of it represents the minimum sustained write speed, with U1 representing 10MBps and U3 writing a minimum speed of 30MBps.

A U3 card will cover most recording modes that are available to the card.

U1 and Class 10 are confusingly basically represent the same thing, with both identifying that the card will not write data at less than 10MBps.

The difference is that U is designed for SD cards that use a USH-I or USH-II bus.

Older non USH cards max out at 25MBps. Whereas USH-I cards max out at 104MBps and USH-II maxing out at 312MBps. You can tell a UHS-II card by a second row of pin on the back of the card. This allows the card to achieve faster write speeds.

The V speed is the same as the U number, representing the minimum sustained speed in MBps the card can write.

Finally

If you haven’t already got one, you will need a decent SD card reader. Check this one I use which is available at the link below:

Anker 2-in-1 USB 3.0 SD Card Reader for SDXC, SDHC, SD, MMC, RS-MMC, Micro SDXC, Micro SD, Micro SDHC Card and UHS-I Cards
  • Simultaneously read and write on two cards to save yourself the effort of constant unplugging and re-plugging.
  • USB 3.0 enables data transfer rates of up to 5Gbps for faster Sync times, backward compatible with USB 2.0/ 1.1.

Last update on 2021-07-04 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

I do hope that the information in this article will help you better work out what card is right for your needs, saving you time and money.

No one wants to get an SD card that turns out to be less capacity than what you needed or alternatively, just as bad, getting a card that’s too big. With those funds which could have been better spent elsewhere.

As always, memory cards are an ever changing landscape, so do comment below if you are a Canon M6 Mark II owner and have found in your experience cards that are possibly better, or cheaper cards that work well in your setup.

Links

Check out what I carry in my camera bag here! Also don’t forget to follow me on YouTube and Instagram.